The Essential Keys to Spiritual Development

The Essential Keys to Spiritual Development. How many of us view having inner balance, a sense of oneness and peace with the world as something that truly completes us?

The Essential Keys to Spiritual Development

When we think of our wellbeing, the first thing that usually comes to mind is our physical health. We equate it with how fit we are, how healthy the food we eat is, and how much vitamins and mineral supplements we ingest. But how often do we primarily equate it with spiritual development? How many of us view having inner balance, a sense of oneness and peace with the world as something that truly completes us? If you feel that you need to work on this area of your life, here are some of the essential keys you need to know and practice:

Control your thoughts. 

Spiritual development starts with removing all negativity from your thoughts. For instance, if you’re the type who always thinks of the worst case scenario, train yourself to be rational. Did your spouse fail to return your calls or messages on time?

Rather than quickly assuming that they may have gotten into an accident, think of alternative, less nerve-wracking reasons. They may be in an area where the signal is pretty bad; hence they are unable to respond. Or they may have gotten caught up in a last minute emergency meeting in the office. Choosing to think of the “lesser evil” of the possible reasons will help calm you down and sustain your inner balance.

Control your actions. 

Your actions in the heat of the moment reflect the state of your inner balance. Don’t let your knee-jerk reactions get in the way of your spiritual development. You need to be in control of yourself during trying times. Getting carried away will only open you up to a world of regret when you have calmed down and reflected on your unsavoury behaviour. So if you want to minimize regrets and lessen the chances of destroying relationships permanently, count one to ten before you slap the offending party in the face!

Control your emotions. 

Spiritual development is also dependent on your ability to control your emotions. If you get easily flustered, panicky or hysterical when you hear bad news, get insulted or receive poor reviews, you won’t be able to attain inner balance and peace. Not to mention you will surely end up with high blood pressure and extreme anxiety which could lead to serious health issues!

So the way to solve this is to build emotional resilience. Learn to detach yourself from the smallest, most insignificant things and focus only on those that matter. Handle crisis, stress and pressure calmly and with a level head. It also helps to plan ahead for outcomes you can easily predict; that way you’re not caught unaware and you lessen your chances of going on panic mode.

Be open-minded and flexible. 

Some of us can be micromanaging control freaks! If you are one, then surely you know the feeling of having your inner balance thrown off when things don’t go your way. If you give your child maths lessons so that he gets an A+ in the test, then he comes home with an A-minus, it’s not the end of the world. Don’t plan your travel itinerary to the letter because you might get crushed when the museum you planned to visit happens to be closed that day. Learn to look past the disappointments and focus on the good things. Learning to adapt to situations keeps you calm and, as a result, helps you achieve spiritual development.

Practice tolerance. 

In order to be at peace with yourself and with the world, you need to accept that people are different. There are cultures, religions, norms, political views and social practices that may seem alien to you, but if you exercise tolerance and respect for others, you will easily achieve spiritual development. Remove all prejudice and hatred from your heart. You will become a much better person without being weighed down by “preconceived garbage” in your heart and mind. Live and let live; with this maxim, attaining inner balance should be a cinch.

Achieving internal harmony need not require a trip to a monastery in some far flung nation. The truth is, the process starts and ends within you. So, rather than literally crossing mountains to find your enlightenment, aim to move mountains within by removing all barriers to your spiritual growth and development.

******Shirley Rieger – About the Author:

Aim for spiritual development as part of your self growth. Attaining inner balance is essential to one’s life if you wish to live each day with inner peace and a feeling of abundance.

What is Self-respect and How Does it Relate to Self-esteem?

The terms “self-esteem” and “self-respect” may seem at first glance very similar, if not exactly the same. But they are indeed very different things and have very different consequences, especially when cultivated at a young age.

i-amPsychiatrists, psychologists, counselors and other experts for years have encouraged parents and teachers to cultivate self-esteem in kids. About thirty years ago, it became very popular among child experts to tout self-esteem as the solution to all our children’s problems. We’ve heard it a million times—high self-esteem is good, low self-esteem is bad. But what does this really mean and what effect does it have in the long-term?

Self-esteem means simply thinking highly of one’s self. Many parents, teachers and psychologists feel that by showering a child with praise, he or she will grow up with a positive attitude and confidence. But often self-esteem that is left unchecked can develop into destructive behavior: thinking less of others, un-gratefulness, arrogance, cockiness. The pursuit of self-esteem can become, as described by family psychologist and parenting expert John Rosemond, “an excuse to do your own thing—regardless of whether or not the “thing” in question is anti-social—and quickly mutate[s] into self-worship.”

Self-respect, on the other hand, is a mindset that allows us to become grateful, humble and well-adjusted. Self-respect encompasses respect not just of ourselves, but also of others. In fact, by respecting our fellow humans we can learn to respect ourselves more. When we have self-respect, we love ourselves but do not become arrogant or cocky. As Rosemond puts it, “A person growing in self-respect understands that he is an imperfect being who was given the gift of life in order to serve.”

Self-respect is akin to the Golden Rule: in order to receive respect and learn to respect ourselves, we must learn to give respect to others. And while having confidence is not a bad thing, people who are over-confident (and who are often seen as arrogant) haven’t learned this principle—that in order to get respect from others and from ourselves, we must first learn to give.

Self-respect is gained “not by being told how wonderful you are,” Rosemond writes. “But by developing respect for others.”

As you’ve probably experienced, people who have grown up being told how great they are usually aren’t very fun to be around and don’t make very good friends. But people who have been taught to take an interest in and care about others while maintaining a positive attitude about themselves tend to be the type of interesting people with whom we enjoy spending time.

By encouraging our children’s individuality and growth by teaching them to be confident yet humble and respectful, we can help them become adults who have healthy, stable relationships and friendships, and respect for themselves and others.

Mark Arens – About the Author:

Help your children to gain self-respect by taking one step at a time. One way to accomplish this is to help your child set goals.

It Can Make or Break A Person

The Power of Your Words

words-powerWHAT kind of words do you use? Do they create energy and make the person you’re addressing to special? Or are they humiliating and can drain the energy to the point that you spoil his or her day? Whoever you are, you have the access to the power of making the person happy by using a language that is pleasing to the ear and can heighten the spirit of one’s soul.

Many of us may not have realized that if we use positive words, it enriches not only the person we are speaking to but also ourselves. When you use positive words of affirmations, you will vastly enrich someone’s life. In the process you’ll also enrich your own spirit. The remarkable fact is that dignity affirmed works like a boomerang. When you affirm someone, you feel affirmed yourself. Suddenly you feel that you have done something wonderful. And, indeed you have. You have helped restore someone’s respect and that is a priceless gift.

Words are meant to be tools to create a positive relationship that meet everyone’s honest need for respect. The use of language, our choice of words, is crucial in the whole self-esteem process. The saying: “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words can never harm me,” is definitely not true. Words can devastate a person; can lead to rejection, alienation, loneliness, bitterness, brokenness. Words can be emotional bombs, swords, bullets. Or when used reverently and sensitively, they can encourage, comfort, inspire, redeem, and create. Yes, words have immense power to affect the way we feel about ourselves.

The epidemic of low self-esteem in our society has been brought on or aggravated by the epidemic of profanity.  The horrific infection of demeaning words has proliferated in our society like a plaque. Real profanity is the use of language that strips people of their dignity, embarrasses them, and humiliates instead of affirming them: generating emotional blockage in the creative process. Words like “stupid,” dumb,” “bad,” idiot,” dirt ball” and other dirty words abuse the holy gift of language, for using something meant to create self-respect and turn it into a weapon that destroys human dignity.

To create and enhance the self-esteem of a person, you can change a person by using positive words that release positive mental pictures of what he can become. The gift of the language is the tool to create positive relationships. The creative use of words sustains positive creative relationship between ourselves and other persons. The healthy relationships stimulated and sustained through the appropriate gifts of creative language will go on to feed our mutual self-respect.

Hanameel Papellero – About the Author:

Hanameel Papellero is a successful teacher whose passion is to seek the meaning and secrets on how to live life to the fullest. She is the maker of YOUR GATEWAY TO SUCCESS BLOG where you can find free downloadable ebooks, audio books and video files to some of the best-selling authors in the world in the field of motivation, inspiration and of success.

Want to live your life to the fullest? Please visit YOUR GATEWAY TO SUCCESS BLOG at http://www.yourgateway2success.com.

We all end up feeling that we need to leave a legacy.

Written by Joanne Wellington

We all end up feeling that we need to leave a legacy . It is a another basic desire to want our lives to count for something.

We all end up feeling that we need to leave a legacy.

We all end up feeling that we need to leave a legacy . It is a another basic desire to want our lives to count for something. “To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and affection of children; to earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty; and to find the best in others; to leave the world a little bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded.”

We all end up feeling that we need to leave a legacy .

Written by Joanne Wellington

We all end up feeling that we need to leave a legacy . It is a another basic desire to want our lives to count for something. “To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and affection of children; to earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty; and to find the best in others; to leave the world a little bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded.”